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Footnotes

  1. Median annual wages for direct care job categories from 1999 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates as published by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  2. Ibid. Calculated based on average of median wages for direct care worker categories by state.
  3. GAO Testimony by William Scanlon, Director, Health Care Issues entitled: Long-Term Care —Baby Boom Generation Increases Challenge of Financing Needed Services, March 27, 2001., p.23.
  4. Ibid.
  5. Health Care Financing Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, "National Health Expenditures," 1998.
  6. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that wage rates for 1999 are calculated based on three years of data: 1997, 1998, and 1999.
  7. NC Division of Facility Services, "Comparing State Efforts to Address the Recruitment and Retention of Nurse Aide and Other Paraprofessional Aide Workers", September, 1999.
  8. GAO testimony, by William Scanlon, Director, Health Care Issues, entitled: Nursing Workforce: Recruitment and Retention of Nurses and Nurse Aides Is a Growing Concern, May 17, 2001, Page 21.
  9. 2.2 million reflects sum of numbers reported employed in 1999 for the three direct care categories examined.
  10. GAO testimony, May, 2001, Op.Cit.
  11. Ibid, page 10.
  12. Ibid, page 20.
  13. US Bureau of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook, Table 1. Fastest Growing Occupations covered in the 2000-01 Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1998-2008, Table 2. Occupations covered in the 2000-01 Occupational Outlook Handbook with the Largest Projected Job Growth.
  14. Ibid
  15. Fullerton, H. N., Jr., 1999. "Labor Force Projections to 2008: Steady Growth and Change in Composition," Monthly Labor Review, November.
  16. NC Division of Facility Services, September, 1999, Op.Cit.
  17. Median annual wages for direct care job categories from 1999 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates as published by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  18. Crown, William H., 1994. A National Profile of Homecare, Nursing Home, and Hospital Aides, Generations, Fall, page 29.
  19. GAO testimony, May, 2001, Op.Cit. Page 23.
  20. States in various geographic regions based on the four regions used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics — "Economy at a Glance". The four regions are comprised of the following states:

    West  

    Midwest

    South

    Northeast

    Alaska     Illinois Alabama Connecticut
    Arizona      Indiana Arkansas Delaware
    California Iowa  Florida  Maine
    Colorado Kansas   Georgia Maryland
    Hawaii Michigan Kentucky Massachusetts
    Idaho Minnesota Louisiana New Hampshire
    Montana   Missouri  Mississippi New Jersey
    Nevada Nebraska North Carolina New York
    New Mexico North Dakota Oklahoma Pennsylvania
    Oregon  Ohio South Carolina Rhode Island
    Utah South Dakota Tennessee Vermont
    Washington    Wisconsin Texas Wyoming
            Virginia   
     
    West Virginia  
  21. GAO testimony, May, 2001, Op.Cit. Page 23.
  22. GAO testimony, May, 2001, Op.Cit. Page 23.
  23. Health Care Financing Administration, State Children’s Health Insurance Program, frequently asked questions, September 11, 1997, 
  24. Poverty thresholds for 2001 for the 48 contiguous states as published in the Federal Register, Vol. 66, No. 33, February 16, 2001, pp.10695-10697 and referenced on the US Department of Health and Human Services websites —Federal Poverty Guidelines for 2001.
  25. Information regarding key program differences across state CHIP programs obtained from June Milby, North Carolina’s Coordinator for NC’s Health Choice for Children program.
  26. Ibid.
  27. IRS publication 596, Earned Income Credit (EIC)
  28. NC Division of Facility Services, Op.Cit.
  29. US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Lost-Work Time Injuries and Illnesses: Characteristics and Resulting Time Away from Work in 1999. Press Release, March 28, 2001.
  30. Education Fund of the Wisconsin Women’s Network — The Self-Sufficiency Standard for Wisconsin, Page 3