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EMS
WORKERS UNITEd

EMS is one of the most dangerous professions in the country. Unfortunately, the EMTs and paramedics who put their lives on the line every day are up against a broken system.

EMS
WORKERS UNITEd

EMS is one of the most dangerous professions in the country. Unfortunately, the EMTs and paramedics who put their lives on the line every day are up against a broken system.

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We're not seen until we're needed.

but when we're needed ...

lives depend on us.

A broken system

As EMTs and paramedics, we often face serious challenges delivering the high-quality care our patients need while working in a system that runs us ragged.

We struggle to eke out a sustainable living while suffering in the shadows from the hazardous work we do — especially those of us employed by private ambulance companies. We walk the line between providing top-notch care for our communities, while working for large corporations that seek to cut costs wherever possible.

the path forward

Learn how joining EMS Workers United/AFSCME has improved
our lives on the job while elevating our profession.
Use arrows to learn how AFSCME has helped fix the system.

use arrows to learn how AFSCME has helped fix the system.

a broken system

Lack of Equipment and training

Proper, functioning equipment is vital for us to do our jobs safely and effectively. But for private EMS operations, cost reigns supreme, and EMS professionals are sometimes forced to make do with ill-equipped ambulances that aren’t stocked with essential supplies.

a broken system

Lack of Equipment and training

Proper, functioning equipment is vital for us to do our jobs safely and effectively. But for private EMS operations, cost reigns supreme, and EMS professionals are sometimes forced to make do with ill-equipped ambulances that aren’t stocked with essential supplies.

Fixing the system with afscme

Equipment and training

Functioning ambulances that are stocked with the supplies we need. Personal protective equipment — paid for by our employers — so we can do our jobs safely and efficiently. EMS Workers United/AFSCME got us the tools we need.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.
O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit

Fixing the system with afscme

Equipment and training

Functioning ambulances that are stocked with the supplies we need. Personal protective equipment — paid for by our employers — so we can do our jobs safely and efficiently. EMS Workers United/AFSCME got us the tools we need.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit.
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.
O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit
Functioning ambulances that are stocked with the supplies we need. Personal protective equipment — paid for by our employers — so we can do our jobs safely and efficiently. EMS Workers United/AFSCME got us the tools we need.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.
O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit

a broken system

Poor wages and benefits

Despite playing a crucial role in our communities and devoting hundreds or even thousands of classroom hours toward our training, EMS professionals often only earn the minimum wage and shoulder the burden of paying the full cost of our health insurance. Meanwhile, the corporations that employ us are growing rich off our backs.

a broken system

low safety, high fatigue

Working 24 hours straight with no break. Performing life-or-death medical procedures having had no sleep, no rest. Fatigue is one of the most common problems we face, since we’re often denied adequate periods of rest and recovery.

fixing the system with afscme

improving safety, Reducing fatigue

Joining a union means we can better fight for our patients and ourselves. Through enforceable, clear policies, we’ve worked with our employers to develop rules to stem fatigue, fairly compensate us for overtime, and most importantly, to keep patient safety a priority despite call tempo. We have also advocated for and won harsher criminal penalties for those who assault and injure emergency responders.
New York City
In New York City’s FDNY EMS, AFSCME members advocated for and won a landmark new law to protect EMS personnel from assaults.
Riverside, California
In Riverside, California/AMR, members won an EMS Professional Practice Committee to work with the employer to reduce turnover and make recommendations to improve patient care and services.
Washington, D.C.
‍‍
In Washington, D.C./AMR, members won overtime penalties to curb excessive holdover demands.
Maricopa, Arizona
In Maricopa, Arizona/AMR, members won contract language to cap maximum consecutive shifts and provide clear guidelines for long-haul interfacility transfers.
New York City
In New York City’s FDNY EMS, AFSCME members advocated for and won a landmark new law to protect EMS personnel from assaults.
Riverside, California
In Riverside, California/AMR, members won an EMS Professional Practice Committee to work with the employer to reduce turnover and make recommendations to improve patient care and services.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C./AMR, members won overtime penalties to limit the potential for excessive holdover demands.
Maricopa, Arizona
In Maricopa, Arizona/AMR, members won contract language to cap maximum consecutive shifts and provide clear guidelines for long-haul interfacility transfers.

a broken system

lack of respect

Unfortunately, many people don’t view EMS professionals as first responders and providers of life-sustaining services. For too long, our contributions have been overlooked. Like the police and fire department, we play an equally important role in the emergency response system and deserve the same recognition.

03

respect

We're not seen until we're needed.

but when we're needed ...

lives depend on us.

A Broken System

equipment
and training

Proper, functioning equipment is vital for us to do our jobs safely and effectively. But for private EMS operations, cost reigns supreme, and EMS professionals are sometimes forced to make do with ill-equipped ambulances that aren’t stocked with essential supplies.

01

01
equipment and training

Unfortunately, some people don’t view EMS professionals as first responders and providers of life sustaining services.

A Broken System

02

safety and fatigue

Working 24 hours straight with no break. Performing life-or-death medical procedures having had no sleep, no rest. Fatigue is one of the most common problems we face, since we’re often denied adequate periods of rest and recovery.

02
safety and fatigue

Working 24 hours straight with no break. Performing life-or-death medical procedures having had no sleep, no rest. Fatigue is one of the most common problems we face, since we’re often denied adequate periods of rest and recovery.

A Broken System

03

respect

Unfortunately, some people don’t view EMS professionals as first responders and providers of life-sustaining services.

03
respect

Unfortunately, some people don’t view EMS professionals as first responders and providers of life sustaining services.

A Broken System

04

danger

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, EMTs and paramedics have "one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations.”

04
danger

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, EMTs and paramedics have "one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations.”

A Broken System

05

wages and benefits

Despite playing a crucial role in our communities, EMS workers often only earn the minimum wage and we shoulder the burden of paying the full cost of our health insurance.

05
wage and benefits

Despite playing a crucial role in our communities, EMS workers often only earn the minimum wage and we shoulder the burden of paying for our health insurance.

the path forward

Learn how joining EMS Workers United/AFSCME has improved our lives on the job while elevating our profession.

a broken system

lack of equipment and training

Proper, functioning equipment is vital for us to do our jobs safely and effectively. But for private EMS operations, cost reigns supreme, and EMS professionals are sometimes forced to make do with ill-equipped ambulances that aren’t stocked with essential supplies.

fixing the system with afscme

equipment and training

Functioning ambulances that are stocked with the supplies we need. Personal protective equipment — paid for by our employers — so we can do our jobs safely and efficiently. EMS Workers United/AFSCME got us the tools we need.

O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit

a broken system

Poor wages and benefits

Despite playing a crucial role in our communities and devoting hundreds or even thousands of classroom hours toward our training, EMS professionals often only earn the minimum wage and shoulder the burden of paying the full cost of our health insurance. Meanwhile, the corporations that employ us are growing rich off our backs.

a broken system

Low safety, high fatigue

Working 24 hours straight with no break. Performing life-or-death medical procedures having had no sleep, no rest. Fatigue is one of the most common problems we face, since we’re often denied adequate periods of rest and recovery.

Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C., that meant obtaining radios for every crew member in the private-sector American Medical Response (AMR) unit
Lake Havasu, Arizona
In Lake Havasu, Arizona/AMR, it means strong contract language to prevent retaliation for reporting unsafe vehicles or equipment.
O’Fallon, Illinois
For O’Fallon, Illinois EMS, it means tuition reimbursement up to a bachelor’s degree at their local college.
Northern California
In Northern California/AMR, that means having access to employer-paid continuing education trainings.

fixing the system with afscme

improving safety, Reducing fatigue

Joining a union means we can better fight for our patients and ourselves. Through enforceable, clear policies, we’ve worked with our employers to develop rules to stem fatigue, fairly compensate us for overtime, and most importantly, to keep patient safety a priority despite call tempo. We have also advocated for and won harsher criminal penalties for those who assault and injure emergency responders.

New York City
In New York City’s FDNY EMS, AFSCME members advocated for and won a landmark new law to protect EMS personnel from assaults.
Maricopa, Arizona
In Maricopa, Arizona/AMR, members won contract language to cap maximum consecutive shifts and provide clear guidelines for long-haul interfacility transfers.
Riverside, California
In Riverside, California/AMR, members won an EMS Professional Practice Committee to work with the employer to reduce turnover and make recommendations to improve patient care and services.
Washington, D.C.
In Washington, D.C./AMR, members won overtime penalties to limit the potential for excessive holdover demands.

a broken system

lack of respect

Unfortunately, many people don’t view EMS professionals as first responders and providers of life-sustaining services. For too long, our contributions have been overlooked. Like the police and fire department, we play an equally important role in the emergency response system and deserve the same recognition.

EMS: IN our OWN WORDS

Tired of being disrespected and ignored while giving our all, EMS professionals across the country are taking a stand.

We joined EMS Workers United/AFSCME, the union for EMS. We’re fighting for a seat at the table, a voice on the job and to be a part of the loudest, most effective union dedicated to elevating our profession.
Click on each member's name to learn how AFSCME has helped them.

stronger united

EMS Workers United/AFSCME has the power to negotiate contracts that raise standards in the industry and allows EMS workers to be treated like the professionals we are.

With more than 25,000 EMS members in both private and public EMS operations, and the backing of members across the country, being a part of the EMS Workers United/AFSCME family means never being ignored … at the bargaining table, in state capitals or in Washington, D.C.

We’re a family and families stand together. Our sisters and brothers in public EMS have rallied behind private EMS employees again and again, as they fight to have their voices heard. Because that’s what families do.
Click a video below to hear how EMS is stronger united

stronger united

EMS Workers United/AFSCME has the power to negotiate contracts that raise standards in the industry and allows EMS workers to be treated like the professionals we are.

With more than 25,000 EMS members in both private and public EMS operations, and the backing of members across the country, being a part of the EMS Workers United/AFSCME family means never being ignored … at the bargaining table, in state capitals or in Washington, D.C.

We’re a family and families stand together. Our sisters and brothers in public EMS have rallied behind private EMS employees again and again, as they fight to have their voices heard. Because that’s what families do.
Click a video below to hear how EMS is stronger united

join ems workers united

Joining AFSCME will help change the game for EMS professionals.
With more than 24,000 EMS workers in both the private and public sectors, we are the nation’s fastest growing EMS union. We stand united with members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), AFL-CIO.

Our mission is to improve the standards in our profession so that we can better serve the public and make EMS work a viable and respected career path.

By joining with AFSCME, we have the strength and resources to improve EMS through collective bargaining and political action, while pushing back against cuts and declining standards. To learn more, visit EMS Workers United/AFSCME.

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With more than 24,000 EMS workers in both the private and public sectors, we are the nation’s fastest growing EMS union. We stand united with members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), AFL-CIO.

Our mission is to improve the standards in our profession so that we can better serve the public and make EMS work a viable and respected career path.

By joining with AFSCME, we have the strength and resources to improve EMS through collective bargaining and political action, while pushing back against cuts and declining standards. To learn more, visit EMS Workers United/AFSCME.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form