Follow
e f t y i

Congress Should Seat Jones Before Voting on ‘Historically Unpopular’ Tax Bill

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
f t e +

AFSCME Pres. Lee Saunders today called on congressional leaders to seat Alabama Sen.-Elect Doug Jones before taking a vote on their “historically unpopular” tax cut plan.

“Congress is considering a radical and historically unpopular tax cut plan that will devastate working families while enriching millionaires, billionaires and CEOs,” Saunders said in a statement. “Democracy, fairness and common sense demand that all representatives elected by their constituents have the chance to deliberate and vote on that plan.”

He added that failure to wait until Jones is seated would “represent a shocking disenfranchisement of the people of Alabama.”

Congressional leaders announced that they have reached agreement on a final version of their tax proposal, which would benefit corporations and the super-rich at the expense of working families. They are expected to schedule votes on the bill next week and send it to President Donald Trump to sign into law before the end of the year. 

But Tuesday night’s victory of Democrat Doug Jones over Republican Roy Moore in an Alabama special election should make congressional leaders think twice about rushing their bill to a vote. With this win, Alabama residents have spoken loud and clear about their priorities, and their voices must be heard.

The tax proposal is a bad deal for everyone but the rich and well-connected. Among other things, it would lower the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent; lower taxes on wealthy individuals; and increase the federal deficit by $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years. It would do all of this on the backs of middle-class families, many of whom would see an increase in their tax burden.

AFSCME has repeatedly spoken out against this atrocious tax initiative, which is a needless giveaway to wealthy corporations and individuals at the expense of working families. AFSCME members have made thousands of phone calls to Congress and made their voices heard loud and clear. Now Alabama’s working families have spoken out, and their voices must also be heard.